Nevada Check Up


Premium Payment Details:

  • A per family quarterly premium will be determined by the specifics of your case and is due every January, April, July, and October
  • You may receive a prorated bill based on your eligibility determination date
  • Late payments may result in the loss of coverage for your child(ren)
  • NO cash payments
  • No payments online or by phone
  • Payments must be mailed to:
   
   Nevada Check Up
    PO Box 847346
    Los Angeles, CA 90084-7346
   
  •  Payments may also be dropped off at:
   
   Division of Healthcare Financing and Policy
    1100 E. William St.
    Carson City, NV 89701
   
 

To enroll for benefits, request cancellation of coverage, report a change of address, or to request a new insurance card, please click on the Access Nevada link below or contact DWSS.

More Information on Nevada Check Up

Authorized under Title XXI of the Social Security Act, Nevada Check Up (NCU) is the State of Nevada's Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

The Division of Welfare and Supportive Services (DWSS) manages the eligibility for NCU. Families may apply for their children online by visiting "Access Nevada", or in person at a DWSS office. Office locations are listed on the DWSS website under, "Contact DWSS".

The Division of Healthcare Financing and Policy (DHCFP) manages the NCU health policy benefit which delivers the basic Medicaid State Plan for health benefits, with some minor exceptions. The Medicaid provider network and/or Medicaid contracted managed care organizations provide covered services to eligible children. NCU enrollees residing in urban Clark or Washoe counties are mandated to receive treatment under an MCO.

The only cost to the Nevada Check Up enrollee is a quarterly premium. Enrollees are not required to pay co-payments, deductibles, or other charges for covered services. Quarterly Nevada Check Up premiums are either $25, $50, or $80 based on gross income and are charged per family (not per child). Quarterly premiums are due in January, April, July, and October and may be prorated based on eligibility determination date. There is a 15-day grace period for quarterly premium payments. the DHCFP sends premium invoices, late and final notices to inform eligible families of their responsibility for payment. If payment is not received by the end of the grace period, children will be disenrolled effective the first day of the following month. American Indians who are members of federally recognized Tribes and Alaskan Natives are exempt from Nevada Check Up premiums.

    Nevada Check Up History

    The Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) was established by Congress to provide access to affordable health insurance for children in working, low-income families. The enabling legislation for CHIP, included in the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, funded the program for a 10-year period. Congress provided funding extension until 2009 when through the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA), Congress provided for continuation of the program. In 2010 the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Health Care Reform) enacted maintenance of effort requirements for continuation of eligibility standards for children until October 1, 2019. On January 22, 2018 a resolution was passed that extends CHIP funding through September 30, 2027. Like Medicaid, CHIP is a joint federal-state program, with funding from both sources, and it is implemented by each state.

    The Mission of the Nevada Check Up program is to provide low-lost comprehensive health care coverage to low income, uninsured children (birth through 18) who are not covered by private insurance or Medicaid; while (1) promoting healthcare coverage for children; (2) encouraging individual responsibility; and (3) working with public and private healthcare providers and community advocates for children.